My Child Finds Maths Challenging

Here’s a question from a mum on our Facebook Group

My older daughter (age 8) has, over the course of the last school year, developed a hatred of maths. We think she is capable, but she now panics and often gets very simple things wrong that she used to know. Worse (for us), she kicks off if we try and broach the subject. Part of the problem is, I think, the fact that she is the only girl in her set, and the others can get quite competitive, which she finds difficult. 

The answers from the group were so helpful, we’ve collected and summarised them here for you.

YouTubeHerStory – Women Explorers

We are huge fans of YouTube, and the educational benefits for kids. Here’s a great way to spend an afternoon – take one of our #12women books, and search YouTube.

Obviously, you won’t find interviews with Gudrid Thorbjarnardóttir, because VikingTube didn’t exist, but there are fascinating stories out there, waiting to be discovered. We’ve compiled a child friendly playlist here.

Watch this inspiring interview with Mae Jamison, first female astronaut of colour

Parenting a Child with a Chronic Health Condition

Parenting brings many challenges, and one of the hardest to deal with is when your child is ill. When this illness is more than a tummy bug or a broken bone, then it gets even harder. Parenting a child with a chronic health condition brings a whole new list of challenges, and adjusting to the diagnosis can be tough for all of the family. Jump! Mag contributor Tina Price-Johnson grew up with a chronic health condition, and wrote an article for children, published today on our site for kids.

Life as a Child with a Chronic Condition

Here’s Tina’s advice for parents of a child with a chronic health condition.

I was 11 years old and in my first year at senior school when I had my first seizure. I was eventually diagnosed with epilepsy and throughout senior school was back and forth to the hospital to see specialists and determine the correct dose of medication. I was generally accompanied by my mum who had to take time off work, and it was my dad who saw my first fit and put into action his first aid training to give me the care I needed at the time. After that it was both parents or my teachers who provided this care.

I was totally freaked out and didn’t know what was happening or why and nor did my parents. In those days you simply did what the doctors told you and didn’t ask questions, and I wish I had asked. So here are my tips for parenting a child with a chronic condition, from the perspective of the child. I hope they are helpful to you:

Bringing up a Child in a Non-Native Language

Is it possible to bring up a child speaking a language that is non-native to either parent?
The global population is becoming increasingly mobile, and it’s not unusual for a family to consist of parents speaking two languages, sometimes even living in a country where a third language is spoken. Sometimes it might even be the wish for a child to learn a third language, that the parents feel will be beneficial to their development and future career.
Let’s take an example – one parent is from Germany, the other parent from Venezuela. They meet and fall in love in Paris, but don’t speak each other’s language, so talk to each other in English, even though neither of them are native speakers. What language should they speak to their child? Or consider the case of a couple from Slovenia. Both are Slovenian, the native language of both is Slovenian, but one speaks English to a very high standard. They decide to bring up their child speaking English.
I spoke to Millie Slavidou, Jump! writer, linguist and mother of bilingual children to find out what she thinks about bringing up a child in a non-native language.

Kiddle Search Engine for Kids

You might have heard of the Kiddle search engine for kids. It was in the news this week, when it was discovered that search terms such as ‘lesbian’ and ‘transgender’ were blocked. We took a closer look to find out what people were annoyed about, and if Kiddle is safe for kids to use.

Dumbing Down Language For Kids

How should we speak to our children? A question that comes up again and again. Should we use baby talk, words like din-dins for a meal and so on, when they are very small? Should we simplify matters during their childhood and avoid longer words and certain types of vocabulary that we regard as more advanced and therefore more complicated? Is one word enough to convey a meaning, or should we use synonyms? Does dumbing down language for kids help or hinder their development?