You’re Not Alone – Charitable Anthology

Today we would like to present to you a wonderful project, put together for charitable purposes. The project in question is an anthology of short stories by diverse writers from around the world, who all donated their time and effort to benefit the Macmillan Cancer Support nurses.

We have spoken to Ian Moore, the compiler of the anthology You’re Not Alone.

#PrettyCurious Workshop at the Science Museum

On Thursday 15th October, the basement of the Science Museum in London was filled with 15 and 16 year olds competently assembling circuits, designing smart gadgets and using laser cutters and 3D printers to bring their creations to life. The atmosphere was buzzing, filled with the excited voices of young engineers as they traded ideas and competed to see who could build the most impressive device. This was the first #PrettyCurious workshop, and all the teenagers were young women.

Teaching Diversity to Kids

Children need to enjoy, play and learn with other children from different backgrounds, cultures and abilities. To understand and embrace other cultures, backgrounds, genders, religions and abilities is key to their happiness. But how do we communicate diversity to children? Cathy Shiel is an actor and drama teacher and came up with a plan.

What is the Etymology of the Word Child?

etymology of the word child

Does the term “etymology” mean anything to you?
Put simply, it is the study of the origin of words and the ways in which their meanings have changed and developed over the course of the centuries.
An etymologist, therefore, is someone who looks at individual words or sometimes phrases and expressions, and tries to trace where they have come from.
A parenting site cannot be complete without reference to what makes us parents: our children, of course. Children fill our days – when we are not with them, we think about them.
What of the etymology of the word child itself? Where does it come from, and has it ever meant anything different?

How To Talk So Your Child’s Teacher Will Listen

You may know the book, “How to Talk So Your Kids Will Listen”, but this article from Life Coach Rebecca Pintre looks at how to talk, so your child’s TEACHER will listen.

Many parents find approaching their child’s teacher to be quite an intimidating experience, especially when the subject matter relates to their or another child’s bad behaviour, bullying or even a complaint with the school. Here are my top tips for talking to your child’s teacher.

Bilingualism and Special Needs

bilingualism and special needs

The third in our series on bilingualism by Millie Slavidou deals with bilingualism and special needs. If you missed the first two parts, you can find them here – 7 Reasons to Bring up Your Kids Bilingual and Supporting Bilingualism in Tweens and Teens.

Parents of children with special needs frequently find they need to grow a thick skin to deal with all the ignorance and comments directed at them, and this is especially true in a bilingual family. As a mother of a child with special needs myself, bringing him up in a bilingual family has been a challenge. I have been accused of deliberately trying to sabotage his development through speaking my own language to him!