Are You a Grammarista? Try our Grammar Test to Find Out

If you need to brush up your grammar, check out our eBook. The book is designed for parents who have found gaps in their knowledge and are struggling to help their kids with homework. If you (or your children) are learning a foreign language, getting to grips with English grammar first is essential.

You can find out more about the book, preview some pages and read reviews here. 

If you have any questions, Millie Slavidou is on Twitter @millieslavidou or on her FB page, where she is always happy to talk about language, grammar, and etymology.

The eBook can be downloaded here – and added to your eReader of choice.

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What is the Etymology of the Word Child?

etymology of the word child

Does the term “etymology” mean anything to you?
Put simply, it is the study of the origin of words and the ways in which their meanings have changed and developed over the course of the centuries.
An etymologist, therefore, is someone who looks at individual words or sometimes phrases and expressions, and tries to trace where they have come from.
A parenting site cannot be complete without reference to what makes us parents: our children, of course. Children fill our days – when we are not with them, we think about them.
What of the etymology of the word child itself? Where does it come from, and has it ever meant anything different?

Reputation Management for Teens and Tweens

Most schools offer good advice, and have policies in place to tackle cyberbullying, but what about the wider implications of the comments that our kids post online? What do parents need to know about reputation management?

How to Make a First Period Kit

No, don’t worry. I’m not going to advise you to throw a First Period Party for your daughter. I can only imagine the sheer horror that my daughter would greet this suggestion. It is probably up there with ‘Mum-dancing with my guidance teacher at the school disco in an effort to get all the kids to dance’ on the 1 – 100 scale of embarrassment.

Talking to kids about sex is an important part of parenting, and a part of this is talking to girls about getting their first period. One of the best ways to help your daughter prepare, is to make a First Period Kit.

LouiseLive Review

If you have a teen or tween, then you are likely aware of YouTubers Zoella, Alfie, Louise, Jack and many others. The popularity of YouTube channels may be a bit of a mystery to some parents, and at times, a bit of a worry. What channel are they watching, who are these young video stars, and how are YouTubers influencing our kids?

An even bigger mystery is why kids want to watch YouTubers live on stage. What do they DO for two hours? Why would kids want to see them, and is it worth taking them? We went along to one such event to get some answers to these and other questions. The LouiseLive show in Edinburgh with Louise Pentland aka Sprinkle of Glitter.

Neuroscience of the Teenage Brain – The Changes of Adolescence

What is Adolescence?

Although we often use the words adolescent and teenager interchangeably, they actually refer to different things. A teenager is a young person between the ages of 13 and 19, while the start of adolescence is marked by the onset of puberty, and its end is generally accepted to be around the age of 19 or 20. While teenagerhood is a social idea, adolescence is a period of biological development common to all human cultures, and one that is also found in many non-human species.

During adolescence young people begin to pull away from their parents and to assert their independence and individuality. At the same time they start to explore their identity and how they fit in with their peers as well as society as a whole. The opinion of their peers is likely to matter more to an adolescent than that of their parents or other adults. They may behave more impulsively and take more risks than before without thought of the consequences, while their sleep patterns change drastically. You’ll be relieved to hear that there are reasons for all this! Our science editor Samantha Gouldson investigates the neuroscience of the teenage brain.