7 Good Reasons to Raise Your Kids Bilingual

Does your family use more than one language? Or does your child speak a different language at school from the one spoken at home? This is the first in a series of three posts by Millie Slavidou – today looking at 7 good reasons to raise your kids bilingual.

In the past, bilingualism was often discouraged, and parents were advised to use only one language with their children. Non-native speaker parents would be encouraged to use what was for them a foreign language to communicate with their children. An awkward and false situation, especially for parents without a strong grasp on the dominant community language.

These days, things have changed. Studies have proved that bilingualism is not only possible, but beneficial. Children can easily cope with more than one native language and soon learn to sort out which vocabulary and grammar structures belong to which language.

Mistakes Can Be A Good Thing

Do you have a perfectionist child? A child sets extremely high standards, and is then frustrated and unhappy if she cannot meet them? A little bit of perfectionism needn’t be a bad thing, but a person who can rarely be satisfied with their efforts, will rarely find pleasure in completing a task. Emily’s daughter is a perfectionist, and she tells us today how she deals with her.

The Problem with Self-Confidence Memes

I know that some people sneer at them, but I do love a good inspirational quote. You know the ‘memes’ that are shared on social media, a photo with text superimposed on it. But some memes make me grit my teeth and click [hide] on Facebook. And not just the ones that ask me to click [like] to help save children with cancer (who believes this crap anyway?!). No, I have a real problem with self-confidence memes.

How to Model Gender Equality to Your Kids

I’d like to think of myself as a feminist. I try, in my day to day life, to espouse feminist principles: I teach my three year old son about enthusiastic consent, I challenge everyday sexism when I encounter it, I maybe probably definitely talk my husband’s ear off about the sexism in the world.

I do have one teeny tiny problem though – my husband and I are both horrible horrible gender stereotypes. He likes comic books and superheroes, cars and bikes, mechanics, woodwork, sports, STEM subjects and steak. I like knitting, baking, sewing, frilly clothes, makeup, arts, writing, babies. My husband goes out to work and I stay at home.

How do you model gender equality  to your kids, when you live a gender stereotype?

Are You a Grammarista? Try our Grammar Test to Find Out

If you need to brush up your grammar, check out our eBook. The book is designed for parents who have found gaps in their knowledge and are struggling to help their kids with homework. If you (or your children) are learning a foreign language, getting to grips with English grammar first is essential.

You can find out more about the book, preview some pages and read reviews here. 

If you have any questions, Millie Slavidou is on Twitter @millieslavidou or on her FB page, where she is always happy to talk about language, grammar, and etymology.

The eBook can be downloaded here – and added to your eReader of choice.

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What Happened when I Broke my Breaking News Addiction

Who remembers the days when the “News” was broadcast at 10pm every evening, and the Sunday papers leisurely read over the course of the week? A holiday used to mean getting away from it all. No work, no phone calls, and in pre-internet days, no emails, no twitter, and certainly no breaking news. Now we have a mobile phone in our pocket, data roaming tariffs, restaurants and hotels with wifi, and so even when we are abroad, we are never out of touch.

Dedicated news channels broadcast 24/7, with flashing BREAKING NEWS and rolling tickers keeping us informed every moment of the day. But are we really informed, or does it just *feel* like it? And what do we do, when our breaking news addiction begins to impact on our health and happiness?