6 Incredible Benefits for Kids and Parents of Learning a Musical Instrument

Children have so much to do these days, with piles of homework, foreign languages to learn and various clubs and activities. With all of this going on, it may seem that music, learning a musical instrument, would simply be adding to the burden. But think on this: imagine a world with no music. Imagine that we were all too busy to learn how to play. No music, no singing. What a joyless place the world would be.

Music has been around for millennia, transcending cultures, times, races, continents. All human societies have some form of music, from simple drums and clapped rhythms, to wooden flutes, to sophisticated electronic equipment. Music, it seems, is part of our very existence.

How to Write a Will – Advice for Parents

Making a Will

Tina Price-Johnson is a Specialist Paralegal in Wills, Probate and Estate Administration, and through her work she has come across distressing situations caused by a decedent having either an invalid will or no will at all.  This can cause major problems for the loved ones left to deal with the aftermath whilst grieving their loss. Based on her experiences, these are her recommedations how to write a will.

Are You a Grammarista? Try our Grammar Test to Find Out

If you need to brush up your grammar, check out our eBook. The book is designed for parents who have found gaps in their knowledge and are struggling to help their kids with homework. If you (or your children) are learning a foreign language, getting to grips with English grammar first is essential.

You can find out more about the book, preview some pages and read reviews here. 

If you have any questions, Millie Slavidou is on Twitter @millieslavidou or on her FB page, where she is always happy to talk about language, grammar, and etymology.

The eBook can be downloaded here – and added to your eReader of choice.

Buy Now

Απλοποίηση της γλώσσας• ναι ή όχι;

If this is all Greek to you (SORRY!), then do pop over here for the English version of why you shouldn’t dumb down your language for your kids. Μετάφραση – Μίλλη Σλαβίδου

Πως θα έπρεπε να μιλάμε στα παιδιά μας; Να ένα ζήτημα που βγαίνει και ξαναβγαίνει. Θα έπρεπε να χρησιμοποιήσουμε τις λεγόμενες μωρουδίστικες λέξεις, όπως τσιτσίκο για το κρέας και νάνι για τον ύπνο όταν είναι πολύ μικρά; Θα έπρεπε να απλοποιήσουμε τη γλώσσα καθ’ολη την παιδική ηλικία, και να αποφεύγουμε μέγαλες λέξεις, τα αποκαλούμενα λόγια ρήματα και άλλα πράγματα που θεωρούμε πολύ προχωρημένα και περίπλοκα; Με μια λέξη μόνο αποδίδουμε το νόημα, άρα να αποφεύγουμε τα συνώνυμα για να μην μπερδεύουμε τα παιδιά; Ποιο είναι το σωστό για την καλή ανάπτυξη και καλλιέργεια των παιδικών μυαλών;

The Problem with Self-Confidence Memes

I know that some people sneer at them, but I do love a good inspirational quote. You know the ‘memes’ that are shared on social media, a photo with text superimposed on it. But some memes make me grit my teeth and click [hide] on Facebook. And not just the ones that ask me to click [like] to help save children with cancer (who believes this crap anyway?!). No, I have a real problem with self-confidence memes.

Being the Mother I Never Had

mothering sunday

On Mothering Sunday my thoughts always turn to those who find this day difficult. Mothers whose children are no longer with them, or those who only have photos and memories of their mother. There is another group of people who find Mothering Sunday hard to bear. Our guest post was written by Alethea, mother of five children who has her own reason for struggling with this day.

 

I’ve been reading blog posts from those who have lost their mum, and so find Mother’s Day painful. Or those who have lost their children, and so Mother’s Day can be unbearable.

I haven’t however seen a blog from someone like me. Who has a mum, but doesn’t. My mother has never really BEEN a mother to to me. Certainly not a mother I can look back and have fond memories of.

I am a mother. I have a wonderful Mother-in-law, but I don’t have a mum I can go to when I am struggling, and she say to me – when I was your age etc.

Or even, when having a trying day with one of the children, that I can moan to her and she remind me of when I was like that, or that age, or silly things I said, or silly things I did.

I don’t know the exact time I was born – My mother always said a different time, and when I did have a relationship with my father, he told me a whole other time of day.

I don’t know what I was like as a baby. I have a few photos, but I don’t know if I was a good sleeper, a happy baby, a grumpy baby.

I don’t know when I took my first steps, or said my first word – or what that word was.

I know how old I was when my mother became too ill to care for me.

I know how old I was when I stopped wanting to see her (and was still forced to continue).

I know how old I was when I was locked in my headmaster’s office at middle school as my mother had escaped her hospital ward and hitch-hiked to get to me and take me away.

I don’t write this for sympathy. I write this as I know I have friends out there who also have their mothers, but don’t. Mainly due to horrific stories in their past.

I hold my hand out to those of you. We rock you know. We are learning how to be the mothers (parents in fact) we always dreamed of, without that perfect lesson we should have had.

 

 

More Reading

How to Break Up with a Toxic Parent  / HeySigmund

“It’s one thing to be dipped in venom by those you don’t really care about, but when it’s by the person who is meant to love you, hold you, and take the sharp edges off the world, while teaching you with love, wisdom and warmth how to do it for yourself, it changes you. There is a different kind of hurt that can only come from the people you love. Kind of like being broken from the inside out… ”

 

A Toast to all the Brave Kids Who Broke Up with their Toxic Moms / Jezebel

“You deserve recognition for completing the hardest break-up known to the human heart.

Whether it was because of an addiction, a compulsive need to put you down, an ex-communication, an inability to give and receive love, or just the turmoil of dealing with a broken woman, you did something that most people regard as taboo. And that takes courage…”