Dumbing Down Language For Kids

How should we speak to our children? A question that comes up again and again. Should we use baby talk, words like din-dins for a meal and so on, when they are very small? Should we simplify matters during their childhood and avoid longer words and certain types of vocabulary that we regard as more advanced and therefore more complicated? Is one word enough to convey a meaning, or should we use synonyms? Does dumbing down language for kids help or hinder their development?

Dear 13 Year Old Me…

Have you ever wished that someone had given you really good advice when you were younger? Perhaps you were lucky and had a trendy auntie or the friend of your mum, who sat down and shared some of their wisdom… because we all knew that our parents were so NOT cool, and not to be listened to. (Note to self – make sure there is someone who fits this bill in your daughter’s life in the coming years!)

If I could go back in time and give myself some advice (without totally FREAKING myself out), this is what I’d tell me.

YouTubeHerStory – Women Explorers

We are huge fans of YouTube, and the educational benefits for kids. Here’s a great way to spend an afternoon – take one of our #12women books, and search YouTube.

Obviously, you won’t find interviews with Gudrid Thorbjarnardóttir, because VikingTube didn’t exist, but there are fascinating stories out there, waiting to be discovered. We’ve compiled a child friendly playlist here.

Watch this inspiring interview with Mae Jamison, first female astronaut of colour

Life Skills – Understanding Debt

During the discussions about our #LifeSkills article,  one of the members of our Facebook Group wrote about children, debt and money management. Understanding debt, not demonising it, is the way to ensure that kids stay safe, Gwen wrote. With her permission, we are sharing her thoughts here.

#PrettyCurious Workshop at the Science Museum

On Thursday 15th October, the basement of the Science Museum in London was filled with 15 and 16 year olds competently assembling circuits, designing smart gadgets and using laser cutters and 3D printers to bring their creations to life. The atmosphere was buzzing, filled with the excited voices of young engineers as they traded ideas and competed to see who could build the most impressive device. This was the first #PrettyCurious workshop, and all the teenagers were young women.

Allow Kids to Fail … and Watch them Grow

Following on from our Life Skills for Kids post, Dinah Turner, mum of three children under ten and director of Stepping into Business describes why we need to let our kids fail …