Encouraging Sisterhood in Teens

One of the members of our Facebook group posted this excellent blog on the ‘mean girls’ scenario, that we are told is all just a part of girls being girls. 
In a discussion afterwards, we talked about encouraging sisterhood in teens, and how to introduce the concept to girls, so that they start supporting each other rather than seeing themselves as competitors. Here are Jayne’s tips:

My Child Finds Maths Challenging

Here’s a question from a mum on our Facebook Group

My older daughter (age 8) has, over the course of the last school year, developed a hatred of maths. We think she is capable, but she now panics and often gets very simple things wrong that she used to know. Worse (for us), she kicks off if we try and broach the subject. Part of the problem is, I think, the fact that she is the only girl in her set, and the others can get quite competitive, which she finds difficult. 

The answers from the group were so helpful, we’ve collected and summarised them here for you.

Neuroscience of the Teenage Brain – The Changes of Adolescence

What is Adolescence?

Although we often use the words adolescent and teenager interchangeably, they actually refer to different things. A teenager is a young person between the ages of 13 and 19, while the start of adolescence is marked by the onset of puberty, and its end is generally accepted to be around the age of 19 or 20. While teenagerhood is a social idea, adolescence is a period of biological development common to all human cultures, and one that is also found in many non-human species.

During adolescence young people begin to pull away from their parents and to assert their independence and individuality. At the same time they start to explore their identity and how they fit in with their peers as well as society as a whole. The opinion of their peers is likely to matter more to an adolescent than that of their parents or other adults. They may behave more impulsively and take more risks than before without thought of the consequences, while their sleep patterns change drastically. You’ll be relieved to hear that there are reasons for all this! Our science editor Samantha Gouldson investigates the neuroscience of the teenage brain.

How to Make a First Period Kit

No, don’t worry. I’m not going to advise you to throw a First Period Party for your daughter. I can only imagine the sheer horror that my daughter would greet this suggestion. It is probably up there with ‘Mum-dancing with my guidance teacher at the school disco in an effort to get all the kids to dance’ on the 1 – 100 scale of embarrassment.

Talking to kids about sex is an important part of parenting, and a part of this is talking to girls about getting their first period. One of the best ways to help your daughter prepare, is to make a First Period Kit.

Simple Tastes 5 – Banana Pancakes

What is better than a plateful of pancakes, on a cold and windy day, to warm the kids up when they come home from school? Asha is back with another #SimpleTastes recipe, and this is one we can’t wait to try out.

I know this series was supposed to be about ideas for weekday dinners, but I couldn’t resist putting this one in. And, to be honest, if you try it, you will see why. So many pancake recipes – and I’m talking about American-style thick pancakes here, not your thin French crepes – seem to involve multiple processes like separating eggs, melting butter and carefully spooning mixture into ring moulds, and, quite frankly, who has time for that, let alone the ensuing washing up? This recipe is simplicity itself, involving little more than forking together a few ingredients in a jug.

Teaching Diversity to Kids

Children need to enjoy, play and learn with other children from different backgrounds, cultures and abilities. To understand and embrace other cultures, backgrounds, genders, religions and abilities is key to their happiness. But how do we communicate diversity to children? Cathy Shiel is an actor and drama teacher and came up with a plan.