Signs of Low Self Esteem

A guest post by Coach Rebecca Pintre, from Artemis Mindset Coaching, on recognising the signs of low self esteem in a child, and what parents can do about it. 

 

Self-esteem is the sense of worth a person has about themselves, the value they put on themselves. It is important to have a good balance of self-esteem and a positive yet realistic sense of self-worth. As a coach, low self-esteem is one of the issues I come across frequently. As a mother of two young girls I know that fostering good self-esteem in my daughters is one of my key tasks.

A lack of self-esteem prevents us from setting high aims, stops us from performing at our best, and hinders our achievement of our goals. It can affect every aspect of our lives, from our career, relationships, and influence our physical and mental health well-being.
Here are five red flags to look out for in your children, and some tips to try and help them raise their self-esteem.

Απλοποίηση της γλώσσας• ναι ή όχι;

If this is all Greek to you (SORRY!), then do pop over here for the English version of why you shouldn’t dumb down your language for your kids. Μετάφραση – Μίλλη Σλαβίδου

Πως θα έπρεπε να μιλάμε στα παιδιά μας; Να ένα ζήτημα που βγαίνει και ξαναβγαίνει. Θα έπρεπε να χρησιμοποιήσουμε τις λεγόμενες μωρουδίστικες λέξεις, όπως τσιτσίκο για το κρέας και νάνι για τον ύπνο όταν είναι πολύ μικρά; Θα έπρεπε να απλοποιήσουμε τη γλώσσα καθ’ολη την παιδική ηλικία, και να αποφεύγουμε μέγαλες λέξεις, τα αποκαλούμενα λόγια ρήματα και άλλα πράγματα που θεωρούμε πολύ προχωρημένα και περίπλοκα; Με μια λέξη μόνο αποδίδουμε το νόημα, άρα να αποφεύγουμε τα συνώνυμα για να μην μπερδεύουμε τα παιδιά; Ποιο είναι το σωστό για την καλή ανάπτυξη και καλλιέργεια των παιδικών μυαλών;

Are You a Grammarista? Try our Grammar Test to Find Out

If you need to brush up your grammar, check out our eBook. The book is designed for parents who have found gaps in their knowledge and are struggling to help their kids with homework. If you (or your children) are learning a foreign language, getting to grips with English grammar first is essential.

You can find out more about the book, preview some pages and read reviews here. 

If you have any questions, Millie Slavidou is on Twitter @millieslavidou or on her FB page, where she is always happy to talk about language, grammar, and etymology.

The eBook can be downloaded here – and added to your eReader of choice.

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Bringing up a Child in a Non-Native Language

Is it possible to bring up a child speaking a language that is non-native to either parent?
The global population is becoming increasingly mobile, and it’s not unusual for a family to consist of parents speaking two languages, sometimes even living in a country where a third language is spoken. Sometimes it might even be the wish for a child to learn a third language, that the parents feel will be beneficial to their development and future career.
Let’s take an example – one parent is from Germany, the other parent from Venezuela. They meet and fall in love in Paris, but don’t speak each other’s language, so talk to each other in English, even though neither of them are native speakers. What language should they speak to their child? Or consider the case of a couple from Slovenia. Both are Slovenian, the native language of both is Slovenian, but one speaks English to a very high standard. They decide to bring up their child speaking English.
I spoke to Millie Slavidou, Jump! writer, linguist and mother of bilingual children to find out what she thinks about bringing up a child in a non-native language.

The Truth about Foodbanks

When our Science Editor Samantha set us the task of thinking up meals to make with the list of goods provided by her local foodbank, our Facebook group took up the challenge. What do you make with a pile of tins and dried food? The suggestions included pasta bake,  jambalaya style rice dish, soup, fishcakes (using tinned fish and potatoes), cottage pie (using Smash and tinned mince), bubble and squeak.
One thing that we quickly realised was that without basic herbs, spices, breadcrumbs, oils and other ingredients to make the food more interesting and tasty, the meals would be bland and boring. Not to mention the lack of fresh fruit and vegetables!
We also realised that we didn’t know as much about them as we thought we did, and asked Sam to tell us the truth about foodbanks, how they are run, and who uses them.

Should We Make Children Apologise?

According a survey, the average British person will say sorry 1.9m times in their lifetime. We say sorry for stepping on toes, sorry for having our toes stepped on, for bumping into people and for being bumped into. Can you get through the day without uttering that word? I doubt it. How and when do you teach your children to say sorry, and is it right to make children apologise?